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Ryan1971

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Reply with quote  #1 
I found a 1979 Chevy Blazer. It was originally owned by either the (Federal) Forest Service, or Oregon Department of Forestry. Part of my project is researching its livery. It is nearly all original sporting a 400 small block and 3 speed manual with granny gear. In the rain it takes in more water than the Titanic. Fortunately, one of the two previous owners did a great job of adding some strategic drain holes and removing all carpeting so there is no rust to speak of. The body mods will be very few. I intend to install a later model 5 or 6 speed manual, upgrade the brakes, and suspension. I am not lifting it, but want to convert to coils overs by either King shocks or Bilstein. My plan is to keep the truck looking really stock, but just do some things to make it more drivable.

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wallew

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Reply with quote  #2 

Nice looking Blazer. I've owned several military Blazers (M1009) but they were all built from 1984 -1986 and they were ALL 6.2L diesels.

Yours looks very nice.

I like the white top.

The green paint is definitely forest service green.


I'm curious about the 400, as they normally came with the 350.

Keep us informed as you learn about your new ride.

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Ryan1971

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Reply with quote  #3 
I am all too familiar with the 1008 and 1009s as an Army vet. Mine is going to be a bit of a mix between those and the fleet vehicle it is. I don't know what the deal was with it being a 400, but I know they were available in Chevy trucks back then so who knows. Is there somewhere on the black that indicates which engine it is? I have owned a number of 70's Chevy trucks, but that is something I have never had reason to look into. Thank you for the kind words Wallew.
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wallew

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Reply with quote  #4 
Actually I think that the VIN should tell you what engine came in the truck to begin with.  According to this decode sheet, it appears there were several V8's.

http://www.73-87chevytrucks.com/techinfo/73-91VIN/1979truck.pdf
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Ryan1971

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Reply with quote  #5 
Thank you!! According to this sheet and my VIN the truck originally came with the 350. I need to find the engine stamping and see if the engine is original, a replacement, and/or replaced with a 400. That was great info, thank you for sharing man!
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Ryan1971

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Reply with quote  #6 
SO!! My next major challenge: A former owner of this truck had a great plan, but executed it poorly. The entire interior floor is covered in some kind of spray in liner. Now that sounds great. However, the top of the transmission tunnel in these trucks is removable (Do you see where this is headed?), but when they sprayed the floor they covered the top of the tunnel bolts and all. I think they only way to remove that stuff is with a media blaster. There is at least a little rust on the drivers side footwells, so I think I am going to have to blast the whole floor just so I know what I am dealing with and can make the proper repairs. I am starting a two year welding and fabrication degree course starting in the fall. OI plan on putting those skills to good use over the coming years with this truck.
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wallew

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Reply with quote  #7 

Well, being a good paint and body person is a great way to make a living.  Have a passion for what you want to do and you will never work a day in your life.

After spending 20 years in computers, my second degree was as a gunsmith.

I look at all sorts of schools for five years.  Mechanics degrees abound.  Hydraulic Mechanic.  Motorcycle mechanic.  Airplane mechanic. 

Then I inspected a school that would have taught me how to be either a private investigator or a body guard.

Then I looked at becoming a gunsmith.  It appealed to me because I learned to take guns apart, figure out what was wrong with them and then fix what was wrong and reassemble them, then TEST my fix.  I learned how to blue guns, I learned to work in a machine shop and how to weld.  I learned how to work with wood.  Then the last part of the school was to repair 40 firearms before I was allowed to graduate.  One of the classes that was a favorite for me was 'the HISTORY OF FIREARMS.  Loved that class.  I also learned how to teach people to shoot and became an NRA Certified Firearms instructor.  And became a Glock armorer.

I did that for almost fifteen years.  Then the wife and I moved to Texas (from Colorado) for her job and I got to retire a little early, but I was ready to stop working.  I have taken care of our house, our dogs and anything else she needed.

Then she retired.  And we are now getting ready to move back to Colorado.  Eventually.  At least that's the plan.

Make your plans for your future.  Carry them out and ENJOY LIFE.  Because sooner than you suspect, you will be retiring.  Plan for that as well.

I love your avatar.  That's BEAN isn't it?

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loach

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Reply with quote  #8 
My son had a 1984 K5.  The old Blazers are very fun to drive.  Any updates so far?
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